Postmodernism

16 new musicians and groups to know in 2022

2021 may not have been the triumphant rebound in music we all hoped for when concerts and festivals were halted due to last year’s roller coaster, but despite unfavorable circumstances, performers continued to innovate. Some of the best tracks of the year have come from little-known newcomers like Daine and Gayle, while talents like Mia Joy and Poupie have reached larger audiences with the best records of their careers.

Here, NYLON has selected 16 promising artists who are sure to have a bright future – from a viral teenage punk outfit inspired by Bikini Kill, to the coolest newcomer in New York rap, to a Japanese pop duo whose songs will fill. one day the arenas. Don’t be surprised in December 2022 to see one of these names on the Star of the Year lists.

Doe

Which: As the protagonist of the best independent coming-of-age films, 18 Doe is both above everything and plunged into the existential pangs of the young adult. “Do I seem to care about you? / Fuck your mom, your little sister and your dad too,” she warns on “IDC”.

What: A combination of modern A&R dream genres, she can make hyperpop (“boys want txtWith ericdoa), post-Lil Peep emo hip-hop (“My outing“), and electronics tinted screamo (“SALT”With Oli Sykes of Bring Me the Horizon).

Where to start:

And after: His mixtape, Quantum leap, arrives in early 2022.

Nilufer Yanya

Which: Critically acclaimed 26-year-old singer-guitarist with a rich and haunting voice. His 2019 album Miss Universe was a leap into wide-format songwriting and continued to excel thereafter.

What: More touching than Cosmo Pyke and Rex Orange County but less esoteric than King Krule, Yanya’s music is uniquely experienced, as if she has performed every song for 25 years and mastered every inflection and every strum. She draws emotion from every note and notable tracks like the uptempo “Tears” and the recent “stabilize” show that she can truly master any tempo.

Where to start:

And after: His third LP, PAINLESS, will be released on March 4.

Doechii

Which: This glamorous, quick-tongued Tampa, Florida rapper made waves in 2020 with the eccentric “Disgusting Blucky Fruit Cake,” her playful single which was not only the perfect self-presentation, but also set to go viral on TikTok. “Hello, I’m Doechii with two Is,” she spits softly on her opening lines – and we haven’t forgotten her since.

What: You won’t find cookie-cutter and trendy raps here. Instead, Doechii’s melodic, singing flow is brimming with attitude, placing her squarely in the lineage of other self-assured greats like Nicki Minaj and Flo Milli.

Where to start:

And after: TBA, but she released a revamped video of her song “Girls” and one collaboration with Isaiah Rashad and Kal Banks in 2021.

Doll

Which: French singer who gained notoriety thanks to a successful passage on the Spanish version of The X factor in 2018 and the French iteration of The voice.

What: An elegant pop and open to the world that channels dancehall (“Like the others“) and reggae (“Dollars”) With trippy trap percussion. Despite the sumptuous soundscapes, Poupie’s voice always finds the right groove, which she raps in nimble triplets (“Thelma and Louise”) Or do their best to channel To classify-Rihanna era (“Tale“).

Where to start:

And after: to be determined

Gayle

Which: A 17-year-old Nashville-based pop prodigy whose single “abcdefu” became one of the out-of-nowhere hits of the 2021 pop-punk resurgence.

What: Straightforward, guitar-focused records that blend the candor of a teenager with the self-awareness of an older artist. “I bite my tongue too much / When people tell me I’m too young / To say all the things I do in my songs,” Gayle sings on “Dumbass.”

Where to start:

And after: A first album, to be released on Atlantic Records.

Tora-i

Which: 21 year old Londoner with a powerful soulful voice who is not afraid to place it in weird and ambitious contexts. She started releasing music days before the lockdown and seems to be redefining her boundaries with each single.

What: Think of Jorja Smith if she had signed with XL Recordings. His first track “Vein” begins as a classic slow-burning R&B before a pitch-shifting bedframe creak of a sample gives it a hypnotic eccentricity. His recent song “PBFF“adds a muted psychedelic element – like a grayscale tie-dye.

Where to start:

And after: to be determined

Spill tab

Which: Franco-Korean-American multi-trait Claire Chicha has become much loved by the cool kids of Lorem and Pollen for her ability to add bite to bedroom pop (“Anybody Else”) or a beating heart to the European-style pop club (“in four”).

What: Over the past two years, Chicha has dropped a streak of singles and EPs culminating in the versatile. Bonnie, which showcases his ability to write itchy lo-fi love songs, dark dance tracks with industrial guitar and floor percussion, and erased indie rock anthems.

Where to start:

And after: to be determined

The Linda Lindas

Which: The Los Angeles punk quartet that went viral last spring after their provocative and muddy song “Racist, Sexist Boy” became a social media sensation. The members are ages 11-17 and play their instruments with the same sense of cathartic aggression you get in any of these angry rooms.

What: Spiky punk music inspired by Washington riot grrrl performs as Sleater-Kinney and Bikini Kill, as well as Alice Bag. Recent singles like “Oh! And “Rebel Girl” add a layer of studio coarse polish, but there’s still a DIY charm to the band’s stuffy riffs and split vocals.

Where to start:

And after: to be determined

Yoasobi

Which: The J-pop duo of producer Ayase and singer Ikura who rose quickly after releasing their debut single “Yoru ni Kakeru” in 2019, and had a prolific 2021 filled with IMAX-sized songs. The band also released their debut album in English, Side E, in November.

What: Sleek arena pop built around sun-kissed piano lines and energized by booming EDM drums and the occasional swell of a main synth. Ikura’s voice blossoms atop these Alice in Wonderland soundscapes, find unique pockets and accentuate the instrumentation with creative tracks.

Where to start:

And after: to be determined

CLIP

Which: Supernaturally cool New York rapper whose twin singles – “SAD B! TCH” and “Calvin K” have become thrills for savvy internet trend-setters.

What: A postmodern take on rap that draws inspiration from both A $ AP Mob and Atlanta’s Awful Record. There are a lot of ambitious production touches, like the drum’n’bass breakdown of “Calvin K”, but CLIPThe charisma of – think a gentler Rico Nasty – is always in the foreground.

Where to start:

And after: to be determined

Kissed moon

Which: High energy synth-pop trio from Brooklyn – Leah, Emily and Khaya – whose music makes you move your feet without skimping on the lyrical and thematic substance.

What: Combining compelling, plunging hooks with messages about consent, existential anxiety and gender identity, Moon Kissed’s music is designed to climax scene in a great coming-of-age movie where the protagonist triumphantly jumps into the pool.

Where to start:

And after: The group had to postpone a New York residency in 2021 but hopefully will be rescheduling these shows soon.

Puppy Girl

Which: Atlanta’s next independent songwriting sensation. 22-year-old Becca Harvey has a hint of the laid-back melancholy of Faye Webster, the bite of alternative rock of Soccer Mommy and the melancholy folk tunes of Phoebe Bridgers. (She even worked with Phoebe’s right-hand associate, Marshall Vore.)

What: Light but substantial indie tunes destined for the 4pm slot at Pitchfork Music Fest or Shaky Knees. The tracks are easy to galore, but his lyrics cover everything from the awkwardness of watching a friend cry in public to the global power of attraction (“I only love you when you breathe / Or move / Or wake you up every mornings, ”she sings on the single“ For You ”).

Where to start:

And after: to be determined

Mo money

Which: Silver-tongued Detroit rapper who carries on her city’s lineage of clever punchlines, arrogant flows, and surreal puns. His 2020 mixtape, Ghetto pop star, features an artist with a big bag of stuff that makes swagger rap seem really effortless.

What: Low-key Midwestern hip-hop where the flow of conversation is underscored by moody pianos. Increasingly, she has shown a willingness to balance hard-edged push bars with melodic hooks that give her crossover potential.

Where to start:

And after: TBD, but kept a low profile in 2021, so hopefully another project will come soon.

my joy

Which: Mia Joy Rocha is Chicago’s latest best-kept music secret. Her eponymous project has been in the works for over five years, and she turned heads in 2021 with the excellent LP Spirit Tamer.

What: A tender and contemplative indie rock that rarely interrupts a walk, but keeps you in mind. Joy is an ironic lyricist, comparing a lover’s inability to call him on his birthday to an absent child on “Ye Old Man”, and bringing subtle religious symbolism to the spectral track “Across Water”.

Where to start:

And after: to be determined

The Zowi

Which: Born in France, raised in Spain trap phenomenon whose work recalls Bad Gyal or Rosalía.

What: Heavily tuned shots automatically, but effortlessly, on Spanish trap and reggaeton. Apple Music lists its 2020 album Elite like “gangsta rap”, and although that’s a bit of a stretch, his icy demeanor on songs like “Boss slut” and “Filet mignon“Really makes her sound like a pivot on the mic.

Where to start:

And after: to be determined

Getting started with pixels

Which: Progressive electronic pop trio bringing their own twist to Chicago’s rich club music history. His 2021 album Arena has a track for every type of warehouse party.

What: Razor-sharp hymns that range from moody industrial techno (“Club Mania”) to airy synth pop (“Alibi”) to sexually assertive bass music (“Alphapussy”).

Where to start:

And after: to be determined